A Process Safety Management Company

Tag: jobs

Blog

What to Know to Succeed at Your First ChemE Job

Looking back on my time before joining the professional workforce, I admittedly did not have a realistic understanding of what an “engineer” truly did day-to-day. While studying chemical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, I imagined a fair amount of my early professional years would be dominated by working technical issues – completing calculations, running simulations, and designing processes.

One of my biggest surprises upon entering the workforce was that unlike my imaginings, a lot of my time was spent determining which information is correct and pertinent and how to best communicate results and issues with others.

While solving problems (a key skill of being an engineer) is an important ability, I found the mark of a great engineer is the ability to communicate difficult ideas, problems, and solutions in such a way that they can be understood easily.

This does not mean “dumbing it down” or speaking down to your coworkers or colleagues; rather, it means latching onto the most important details that your client, colleague or superior needs and explaining it concisely and accurately.

My time here at Provenance Consulting and working with clients in the industry and countless chemical engineers, young and seasoned alike, has helped me hone in on three things that make the difference between a young engineer who “gets it” and one that is stuck in that college classroom. Take a page from my book – it’ll give you a head start on nailing those first few years of your career.

#1: Engineering is WHAT You Do, but in Industry, PSM is HOW You Do It

A common complaint from young chemical engineers, specifically in regulated facilities, is an annoyance with Management of Change (MOC) and other similar programs that ensure Process Safety Management (PSM) compliance. MOCs are seen as a hassle mainly because young engineers don’t understand the value of them or how the facility’s MOCs are implemented. One benefit of a proper, functioning MOC program is that it makes the facility’s Process Safety Information – the P&IDs, H&MBs, line listings – continually accurate. One of the most surprising things to me when I began working with drawings was a common refrain from numerous operators and engineers across a number of companies and facilities:

“You can’t trust the drawings”

This phrase means that the drawings – which are critically important for new projects and general understanding of a facility – are admitted to not be correct. One of the challenges for a young engineer is figuring out which data sources to use to obtain the “correct” data, since that data may exist in four different places. For example, a maximum allowable working pressure (MAWP) might be in inspection software, relief systems design basis, original vessel calculations, on a P&ID, or any number of internal databases.

If these numbers differ, what is the correct value that should be used? At different facilities, the answer is often different.

A functioning MOC program not only ensures the facility is safe and compliant, but it also ensures that your data is correct across a number of different data sources at the facility. This is just one example of the ripple effect these parts of Process Safety have across the facility.

#2: The “Boring” Stuff Matters to Your Boss’s Boss

Ensuring you record and report correct data not only saves you time as you do subsequent work, it also becomes invaluable to the people who will use your work down the road. Large capital projects can go significantly over-budget based on the amount of time needed to verify or correct data that “should” already be correct.

Engineers who understand and ensure that information is correct are an important asset to their company. Your boss (and his boss) will notice whether he can trust your data or if there is a pattern of verification that always needs to happen.

When you are building your professional reputation, it’s these little things that can make the difference between becoming the engineer that managers can rely on, and the engineer who is inconsistent. Trust me – you want to be the former!

#3: Undocumented Institutional Knowledge is a Major Asset: USE IT

Often, a new engineer feels overwhelmed by the new responsibilities and tasks at a facility. It can feel like you are barely treading water. One of the best sources of information and help in any facility is the know-how that exists among the engineers and operators who have been at the plant for a while: the “institutional knowledge” of the facility.

Visit the field, ask questions and – more importantly – listen to the answers that they provide; most experienced personnel enjoy sharing their knowledge if you take an interest.

Oftentimes the most confusing parts of a plant or process make sense if you take the time to look at them in the field and learn the nuances of the facility. Additionally, speaking with more senior personnel allows you to develop personal relationships with them, which builds trust with your colleagues and allows for a mutual respect and better ability to work through issues as they arise.

Just because someone doesn’t have an engineering degree doesn’t mean you know more than they.

Some of these men (and women) at your facility have worked with the equipment since before you were born. The design specs may say it should work a certain way, but those operators and seasoned personnel are a wealth of practical information. Listening to them could save you significant time (and money). You’ve got to work with the entire team to be successful – you can’t just stick with engineers if you want to advance. Learn to work with everyone and understand the value they bring to the company.

Be Great, not Just Good

Being successful at engineering in the real world includes doing things that seem “boring” or “extra” and it means working with people who have a different skill set and experience than yours. A good engineer recognizes that and does what they have to. A GREAT engineer sees the ripple effect of those “small” tasks, the importance of process safety in all that we do, and that the people in our organizations with experience on the ground can be some of our greatest resources.

About the Author – James Topp

James Topp is a PSM Consultant with Provenance Consulting. A graduate from the University of Texas BS Chemical Engineering Class of 2016, he’s been with Provenance since 2015. His roles have included a Co-op position, intern and full time engineer.

During his tenure with Provenance, James has focused on many areas of Process Safety. Mainly, he has worked in Relief Systems engineering for multiple clients and plants including chemical plants, midstream facilities, and refineries across multiple states; completed a maximum intended inventory for a large midstream facility; facilitated MOC coordination and auditing for refineries; and utilized ProvPSM’s ARTS software for PSI reconciliation – among many other projects.

In his personal life, James enjoys reading, travel, skiing, and telling people how the 2008 Longhorns were robbed of winning the Big XII Championship and competing for a national title, despite the fact that they had the same record as and had beaten the eventual Big XII champion, OU, on a neutral site.

More Company Posts

Blog
May 2019 Newsletter [ProvPSM Perspectives]
Spring 2019 has been nonstop for Provenance Consulting. We exhibited at three major industry conferences, volunteered at a number of community events in multiple cities, learned more about deepening our...
Read more
Blog, Data Management, PHA
How Better Access to PHA Data Can Inform Your MOC Process
Read more

PSM Consultant – Mechanical Integrity

Through innovation and technology, Provenance Consulting provides information management systems and services that track, monitor, verify, and sustain data that personnel use in the operation of oil, gas, and chemical plants and facilities. We specialize in process safety management, software implementation, and custom software development. We not only implement and maintain information systems and processes, but we build the foundation of these systems that ensure the data utilized is accurate.

Job Description

The Process Safety Management (PSM) Consultant is expected to utilize expertise in the area of process design, analysis, and operations to deliver quality results to clients. Focus is on process safety management in the area of mechanical integrity. Emphasis is placed on quality of the work product and the efficiency of work execution.

The PSM Consultant will report to either a site manager or project manager who will establish clear expectations in terms of work quality, efficiency, and technical development. The PSM Consultant will work directly with clients on technical aspects of the projects and therefore must be able to communicate technical requirements and deliverables clearly and concisely.

To fulfill this role, the PSM Consultant will:

  • Input inspection data into client application
  • Identify inspection points per industry standard
  • Participate in damage mechanism studies
  • Present results to clients or members of management
  • Perform quality checks
  • Interpret data from piping & instrument diagrams, process flow diagrams, plot plans, piping isometrics, mechanical design information
  • Understand and comply with all Provenance and client safety procedures that govern the work being performed

Location

The position is located in Borger, TX (45 minutes northeast of Amarillo), with work throughout the Southwest region of the United States.  Relocation incentives will be provided for qualified candidates.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have:

  • A mechanical engineering degree
  • Two to five years of experience in a petrochemical plant or refinery, preferred
  • Knowledge in application and compliance requirements of regulatory codes (OSHA, EPA, etc.) and industry standards and recommended practices (API, NFPA, ASME, etc.), preferred
  • Legal authorization to work in the United States

Job Benefits

Provenance Consulting offers competitive salaries and comprehensive benefits and programs including: health and welfare, 401K, paid time off program, career mobility, volunteer opportunities, and other programs.

For more information about Provenance Consulting, contact Human Resources at 806-273-5100.

 

Provenance Consulting values people from diverse backgrounds, working to create an open atmosphere of trust, honesty and respect. Harassment or discrimination of any kind – including that involving race, color, religion, gender, age, national origin, citizenship, disabilities, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other similarly protected status is unacceptable. This principle applies to all aspects of employment, including recruitment, hiring, placement, transfer, promotion, layoff, recall, termination and other terms and conditions of employment.

Mechanical Integrity Line of Service Manager

Through innovation and technology, Provenance Consulting provides information management systems and services that track, monitor, verify, and sustain data that personnel use in the operation of oil, gas, and chemical plants and facilities. We specialize in process safety management, software implementation, and custom software development. We not only implement and maintain information systems and processes, but we build the foundation of these systems that ensure the data utilized is accurate.

Job Description

The Mechanical Integrity (MI) Line of Service (LOS) Manager is responsible for coordinating API Inspectors, nondestructive examiners, engineers and other field and office support resources on multiple projects at any given time.  The MI LOS Manager will report to site managers or project managers who will establish clear expectations in terms of work scope, work quality and work efficiency on the projects for which they are responsible. The MI LOS Manager may be expected to work directly with clients on technical aspects of projects and therefore must be able to communicate technical requirements, concepts and deliverables clearly and concisely.

Emphasis is placed on quality of the work product and the efficiency of work execution. The MI LOS Manager is accountable for the quality of work provided by MI/Inspection resources; therefore the MI LOS Manager is responsible for training and ensuring quality and efficiency.  Candidate will help establish efficient and effective means of tracking and reporting metrics related to MI/Inspection project execution.   The MI LOS Manager is accountable for the professional development of MI-related resources throughout the company.

To fulfill this role, the MI LOS Manager will:

  • Staff, manage and execute projects related to Fixed Equipment Mechanical Integrity and Inspection
  • Ensure procedures exist, and are kept current and accurate for all work execution activities
  • Confirm that all MI/Inspection work is performed in alignment with defined procedures through training and ongoing quality control (QC)
  • Oversee the generation and issuance of final deliverables to the client or Project Lead, ensuring that a quality control process has been developed, implemented, followed and tracked during generation of final deliverables
  • Hire, train, develop, and provide guidance to newer employees as necessary
  • Ensure adequacy of, and compliance with, all Provenance and client safety procedures that govern the work being performed
  • Perform staff-level assignments and resource coordination in a team environment

Location

The position is located in Borger, TX (45 minutes northeast of Amarillo) with possible work at other locations.  Travel up to 50% of the time should be expected.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have:

  • An engineering degree
  • At least 5 years of direct Mechanical Integrity and Inspection experience (direct, hands-on experience should encompass all aspects of fixed equipment MI, including inspection planning, evaluation of inspection results, identification of corrective actions and reporting)
  • Familiarity with the following industry codes, standards, recommended practices, and related bodies of knowledge.  Preference will be given to candidates that maintain current certifications through the appropriate governing body:
    • API 510, 570, 571, 576, 577, 579, 580, 581, 650, 653
    • Other API codes, guidelines and recommended practices relating to MI
    • ASME B31.x, S8/D1
    • AWS-CWI
  • Work history reflecting the following:
    • Significant field or engineering hours actively performing inspection and other mechanical integrity activities
    • Increasing responsibility, especially with regard to overseeing inspection activities, project management, and budget ownership
  • The ability to organize, prioritize, and execute a heavy work load
  • The ability to understand and comply with all Provenance and client safety procedures that govern the work being performed
  • The ability to communicate effectively through verbal and written means, and able to adapt communication to best reach the intended audience within or outside the organization
  • The ability to travel as needed to support ongoing projects and develop sales opportunities
  • Experience in a petrochemical plant or refinery, preferred
  • Strong technical communication ability, both written and oral
  • Legal authorization to work in the United States

Job Benefits

Provenance Consulting offers competitive salaries and comprehensive benefits and programs including: medical, dental, vision, 401K, paid time off, career progression, volunteer opportunities, and training/certificate programs.

For more information about Provenance Consulting, contact Human Resources at 806-273-5100.

 

Provenance Consulting values people from diverse backgrounds, working to create an open atmosphere of trust, honesty and respect. Harassment or discrimination of any kind – including that involving race, color, religion, gender, age, national origin, citizenship, disabilities, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other similarly protected status is unacceptable. This principle applies to all aspects of employment, including recruitment, hiring, placement, transfer, promotion, layoff, recall, termination and other terms and conditions of employment.